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1 week ago

'Two Petite Dancing Ballerinas (Fuchsia Flowers) UK'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Fuchsia leaves are opposite or in whorls of three to five, simple lanceolate, and usually have serrated margins (entire in some species), 1–25 cm long, and can be either deciduous or evergreen, depending on the species.

The flowers are very decorative; they have a pendulous teardrop shape and are displayed in profusion throughout the summer and autumn, and all year in tropical species. They have four long, slender sepals and four shorter, broader petals; in many species, the sepals are bright red and the petals purple (colours that attract the hummingbirds that pollinate them), but the colours can vary from white to dark red, purple-blue, and orange. A few have yellowish tones.

The ovary is inferior and the fruit is a small (5–25 mm) dark reddish green, deep red, or deep purple berry, containing numerous very small seeds. Extract taken from Wikipedia.
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Two Petite Dancing Ballerinas (Fuchsia Flowers) UK
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Fuchsia leaves are opposite or in whorls of three to five, simple lanceolate, and usually have serrated margins (entire in some species), 1–25 cm long, and can be either deciduous or evergreen, depending on the species.

The flowers are very decorative; they have a pendulous teardrop shape and are displayed in profusion throughout the summer and autumn, and all year in tropical species. They have four long, slender sepals and four shorter, broader petals; in many species, the sepals are bright red and the petals purple (colours that attract the hummingbirds that pollinate them), but the colours can vary from white to dark red, purple-blue, and orange. A few have yellowish tones.

The ovary is inferior and the fruit is a small (5–25 mm) dark reddish green, deep red, or deep purple berry, containing numerous very small seeds. Extract taken from Wikipedia.
2 weeks ago

'Green Sandpiper & Dunlin'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

The Green Sandpiper (foreground) is a medium-sized, elegant bird that can be spotted feeding around the edge of freshwater marshes, lakes, flooded gravel pits and rivers. It rarely uses its bill for probing the mud, but prefers to pick invertebrates from the surface of the water. It bobs up and down when standing and will fly-off in a zig-zag pattern when disturbed. Extract taken from Wildlife Trust (UK).

The Dunlin (background) is a small sandpiper, which can be found at the coast all year round, preferring estuaries, where it seeks out insects, worms and molluscs to eat. In winter, it feeds in large flocks and roosts in nearby fields and saltmarshes. In summer, it breeds in the uplands of the UK, with large numbers in the Western and Northern Isles of Scotland, and the Pennines in England. Extract taken from Wildlife Trust (UK).
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Green Sandpiper & Dunlin
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

The Green Sandpiper (foreground) is a medium-sized, elegant bird that can be spotted feeding around the edge of freshwater marshes, lakes, flooded gravel pits and rivers. It rarely uses its bill for probing the mud, but prefers to pick invertebrates from the surface of the water. It bobs up and down when standing and will fly-off in a zig-zag pattern when disturbed. Extract taken from Wildlife Trust (UK).

The Dunlin (background) is a small sandpiper, which can be found at the coast all year round, preferring estuaries, where it seeks out insects, worms and molluscs to eat. In winter, it feeds in large flocks and roosts in nearby fields and saltmarshes. In summer, it breeds in the uplands of the UK, with large numbers in the Western and Northern Isles of Scotland, and the Pennines in England. Extract taken from Wildlife Trust (UK).

Comment on Facebook

Absolutely Gorgeous

Lovely

2 weeks ago

'Stealth - Fox Cub in the Wild'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Foxes are social animals and live in loose family groups. These are normally made up of a breeding male, female and their young. Mating takes place in winter and this is when foxes are at their most vocal, barking and screeching loudly as they look to attract a mate and fend off rivals.

Come spring, the female will give birth to a litter of cubs in an underground den. Normally, four or five cubs will be born and they will be cared for by both the male and female.

By autumn, the cubs are fully self-sufficient. Some will leave to establish their own territories, while others may remain with the family group. Those that stay sometimes help their parents to raise the following year’s young. Extract taken from the Woodland Trust (UK).
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Stealth - Fox Cub in the Wild
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Foxes are social animals and live in loose family groups. These are normally made up of a breeding male, female and their young. Mating takes place in winter and this is when foxes are at their most vocal, barking and screeching loudly as they look to attract a mate and fend off rivals.

Come spring, the female will give birth to a litter of cubs in an underground den. Normally, four or five cubs will be born and they will be cared for by both the male and female.

By autumn, the cubs are fully self-sufficient. Some will leave to establish their own territories, while others may remain with the family group. Those that stay sometimes help their parents to raise the following year’s young. Extract taken from  the Woodland Trust (UK).
2 weeks ago

'The Importance of BEEing a BEE (UK)'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Honey bees are super-important pollinators for flowers, fruits and vegetables. This means that they help other plants grow! Bees transfer pollen between the male and female parts, allowing plants to grow seeds and fruit.

Honey bees live in hives (or colonies). The members of the hive are divided into three types:

Queen: One queen runs the whole hive. Her job is to lay the eggs that will spawn the hive’s next generation of bees. The queen also produces chemicals that guide the behaviour of the other bees.

Workers: these are all female and their roles are to forage for food (pollen and nectar from flowers), build and protect the hive, clean and circulate air by beating their wings. Workers are the only bees most people ever see flying around outside the hive.

Drones: These are the male bees, and their purpose is to mate with the new queen. Several hundred live in each hive during the spring and summer. But come winter, when the hive goes into survival mode, the drones are kicked out! Extract taken from National Geographic (Kids).
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The Importance of BEEing a BEE (UK)
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Honey bees are super-important pollinators for flowers, fruits and vegetables. This means that they help other plants grow! Bees transfer pollen between the male and female parts, allowing plants to grow seeds and fruit.

Honey bees live in hives (or colonies). The members of the hive are divided into three types:

Queen: One queen runs the whole hive. Her job is to lay the eggs that will spawn the hive’s next generation of bees. The queen also produces chemicals that guide the behaviour of the other bees.

Workers: these are all female and their roles are to forage for food (pollen and nectar from flowers), build and protect the hive, clean and circulate air by beating their wings. Workers are the only bees most people ever see flying around outside the hive.

Drones: These are the male bees, and their purpose is to mate with the new queen. Several hundred live in each hive during the spring and summer. But come winter, when the hive goes into survival mode, the drones are kicked out! Extract taken from National Geographic (Kids).

Comment on Facebook

We must protect the bees or we will be i serious trouble. They pollinate and are critical for our fresh foods. ⁸

So beautiful! Awesome photography ❤💚💛

Beautiful ❤️

Great photo

So beautiful!!

nice

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2 weeks ago

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝗶𝘁 𝗶𝘀 𝗼𝘃𝗲𝗿...

Here are our fixtures for the 2022-23 Premier League campaign 🗓️

First up: Newcastle United (a) 📍

🌳🔴 #NFFC #PL
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2 weeks ago

'The Importance of BEEing a Bee (UK)'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Almost 90% of wild plants and 75% of leading global crops depend on animal pollination. One out of every three mouthfuls of our food depends on pollinators such as bees. Crops that depend on pollination are five times more valuable than those that do not.

We can all do our bit to help bees whether that’s in our gardens, balconies or windowsills. You can also chat to friends and family about how cool bees are and help them to make their wild spaces bee-friendly.

Plant a range of flowers in your garden so bees have access to nectar from March to October. Bees love traditional cottage garden flowers and native wildflowers, like primrose, buddleia, and marigolds. Extract taken from The World Wildlife Fund (WWF).
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The Importance of BEEing a Bee (UK)
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Almost 90% of wild plants and 75% of leading global crops depend on animal pollination. One out of every three mouthfuls of our food depends on pollinators such as bees. Crops that depend on pollination are five times more valuable than those that do not.

We can all do our bit to help bees whether that’s in our gardens, balconies or windowsills. You can also chat to friends and family about how cool bees are and help them to make their wild spaces bee-friendly.  

Plant a range of flowers in your garden so bees have access to nectar from March to October. Bees love traditional cottage garden flowers and native wildflowers, like primrose, buddleia, and marigolds. Extract taken from The World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

Comment on Facebook

very pretty good

So beautifull

2 weeks ago

'Fox Cub in the Wild - a chance meeting'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Red foxes live around the world in many diverse habitats including forests, grasslands, mountains, and deserts. They also adapt well to human environments such as farms, suburban areas, and even large communities.

The red fox's resourcefulness has earned it a legendary reputation for intelligence and cunning.

Red foxes are solitary hunters who feed on rodents, rabbits, birds, and other small game—but their diet can be as flexible as their home habitat. Foxes will eat fruit and vegetables, fish, frogs, and even worms. If living among humans, foxes will opportunistically dine on garbage and pet food.

Like a cat's, the fox's thick tail aids its balance, but it has other uses as well. A fox uses its tail (or “brush”) as a warm cover in cold weather and as a signal flag to communicate with other foxes.

Foxes also signal each other by making scent posts—urinating on trees or rocks to announce their presence. Extract taken from National Geographic.
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Fox Cub in the Wild - a chance meeting
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Red foxes live around the world in many diverse habitats including forests, grasslands, mountains, and deserts. They also adapt well to human environments such as farms, suburban areas, and even large communities.

The red foxs resourcefulness has earned it a legendary reputation for intelligence and cunning.

Red foxes are solitary hunters who feed on rodents, rabbits, birds, and other small game—but their diet can be as flexible as their home habitat. Foxes will eat fruit and vegetables, fish, frogs, and even worms. If living among humans, foxes will opportunistically dine on garbage and pet food.

Like a cats, the foxs thick tail aids its balance, but it has other uses as well. A fox uses its tail (or “brush”) as a warm cover in cold weather and as a signal flag to communicate with other foxes.

Foxes also signal each other by making scent posts—urinating on trees or rocks to announce their presence. Extract taken from National Geographic.

Comment on Facebook

Lovely pic ❤️❤️

Lovely

Absolutely Gorgeous

nice pic

Beautiful 😍

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2 weeks ago

'Growing Old Gracefully (UK)'
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Roses (Rosa) are a classic and instantly recognisable plant, ideal for almost every style of garden. They flower abundantly from early summer in a choice of colours including pastel shades of pink, peach, cream or snowy-white; vibrant yellow and gold; orange, crimson or red.

Many roses are fragrant. Some types flower in one flush of blooms while others flower all summer long. Some have colourful fruits (hips).

Plants come in a range of forms, from traditional shrubs and climbers to miniature plants for patio containers. Extract taken from the Royal Horticultural Society (UK).
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Growing Old Gracefully (UK)
By CRUSH Photography©
www.crush.photography
www.instagram.com/crushphotography2021

Roses (Rosa) are a classic and instantly recognisable plant, ideal for almost every style of garden. They flower abundantly from early summer in a choice of colours including pastel shades of pink, peach, cream or snowy-white; vibrant yellow and gold; orange, crimson or red.

Many roses are fragrant. Some types flower in one flush of blooms while others flower all summer long. Some have colourful fruits (hips).

Plants come in a range of forms, from traditional shrubs and climbers to miniature plants for patio containers. Extract taken from the Royal Horticultural Society (UK).
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